Robert Hornung to lead the Canadian Renewable Energy Association

May 19, 2020

A new national voice for the wind, solar and energy storage industries

Ottawa, Ontario, May 19, 2020 – Today the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) and the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) are pleased to announce the name and leader of the new multi-technology association that will provide a unified voice for solar energy, wind energy, and energy storage in Canada. Effective July 1, 2020, the members of CanSIA and CanWEA will unite within the Canadian Renewable Energy Association under the trusted leadership of Robert Hornung, the long-standing president of CanWEA.

As the founding President and CEO of the Canadian Renewable Energy Association, Mr. Hornung will lead the member-based association in stakeholder advocacy and public engagement focused on ensuring that renewable energy and energy storage play a central role in transforming Canada’s energy mix during this period of historical global transformation.

With a corporate office in Ottawa, the Canadian Renewable Energy Association will have national influence as well as a regional presence in jurisdictions across the country. The association will work to create conditions for a modern energy system that makes significant and positive contributions to Canada’s economy and clean energy future. It will provide forums devoted to dialogue, collaboration and stewardship, and growth of the industry.

The formation of the Canadian Renewable Energy Association reflects the growing importance of innovative energy solutions that integrate multiple renewable energy technologies. The members of the Canadian Renewable Energy Association are uniquely positioned to deliver clean, low-cost, reliable, flexible and scalable solutions for Canada’s energy needs.

Wind and solar generation meet an already significant and growing proportion of Canadian electricity demand, with a combined grid-connected installed capacity of more than 16,500 megawatts (MW). Recent power purchase contracts have confirmed that wind and solar energy are cost-competitive with conventional generation, with wind now being the lowest-cost source of new electricity generation in Canada. There is also rapid deployment of these technologies at both residential and commercial scales in Canada. Solar PV has been deployed in every province and territory across Canada. As Canada’s leader in residential and commercial solar installations, Ontario reported a total of 2,673 MW in solar PV installations at the end of 2019. Diverse energy storage projects are playing a growing role in maximizing the contributions of clean generation to grid flexibility and reliability, with more than 20 storage facilities under contract by Ontario’s grid operator alone.

Quotes

“The launch of the Canadian Renewable Energy Association is a major step forward toward the realization of more comprehensive energy solutions encompassing wind, solar and energy storage in Canada. It needs a leader with a clear vision of the modern energy system we’re building in Canada, and an understanding of our membership’s unique role in that effort. Robert Hornung brings that to the table, and we look forward to his leadership as our industries join forces in this very exciting new endeavour.”

– Michelle Chislett, Interim Board Chair, Canadian Renewable Energy Association; and Managing Director, Canada & U.S. Development, Northland Power

“We’re launching a new association not only during an ongoing energy transition, but also during the massive challenge of managing through a pandemic and ensuring recovery from its economic impacts. More than ever, Canada’s policy focus must remain on a transition to a clean economy powered by renewable energy. A unified voice for solar energy, wind energy and energy storage will help navigate the way to Canada’s emission reduction targets while creating good jobs and economic opportunity in urban centres, rural areas and Indigenous communities across the country.”

– Jason Chee-Aloy, Interim Board Vice Chair, Canadian Renewable Energy Association; and Managing Director, Power Advisory LLC

“I’m honoured and excited to be leading a new association with a mandate unlike any other. There is a clear public desire to see advancement of the technologies we represent to capture the full promise of a renewable energy future. The Canadian Renewable Energy Association is the right vehicle to help make that promise a reality, while delivering great business value to each and every member.”

– Robert Hornung, President & CEO, Canadian Renewable Energy Association

Robert Hornung Biography

Robert Hornung has been President of the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) for nearly 17 years. During his time as President, he represented the interests of CanWEA members who are Canada’s wind energy leaders – wind farm owners, operators, project developers, consultants, manufacturers and service providers. Together with members and stakeholders, Robert helped facilitate wind energy growth in Canada from under 300 megawatts to over 13,000 megawatts of installed capacity through advocacy and engagement efforts. Prior to joining CanWEA, Robert worked on climate change issues with the Pembina Institute, Environment Canada, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development and Friends of the Earth Canada. Robert is currently on the Advisory Council of Positive Energy, a University of Ottawa research project that seeks to strengthen public confidence in Canadian energy policy.

Background


-30-

About the Canadian Renewable Energy Association

The Canadian Renewable Energy Association is the voice for wind energy, solar energy and energy storage solutions that will power Canada’s energy future. Our association works to create the conditions for a modern energy system through stakeholder advocacy and public engagement. Our diverse members are uniquely positioned to deliver clean, low-cost, reliable, flexible and scalable solutions for Canada’s energy needs. Our vision is to ensure wind energy, solar energy and energy storage play a central role in transforming Canada’s energy mix.

Companies across Canada united on vision for a resilient recovery

May 13, 2020

CANADA – COVID-19 has disrupted our way of life, and immediate relief has been the priority of governments. But what will recovery look like? And how do we ensure recovery measures aren’t just shovel-ready but shovel-worthy?

A new public letter asking Canadian governments to pursue a “resilient recovery” has attracted the signatures of companies and industry associations across Canada. As of Tuesday, over 200 signatories representing over 2,000 Canadian companies had joined the campaign asking federal and provincial governments to commit to a three-part recovery and resilience plan that would:

  • invest stimulus into Canada’s fast-growing clean energy and cleantech sectors and the local production and export of world-leading low- and zero-carbon commodities;
  • act quickly to support clean energy and cleantech solutions and businesses by expanding existing initiatives and programs; and
  • signal clearly that Canada will continue and expand on its climate and environmental policies.

The letter also emphasizes regional equity and “training and retraining for Canadians whose past jobs may not return, in programs that can and should start now while unemployed workers are sitting at home.”

Ultimately, the signatories say, government stimulus and recovery efforts can do more than just create jobs: they’re an opportunity to encourage economic diversification and innovation, cut both carbon pollution and illness-causing air pollution, and make Canada a more resilient country.

Visit resilientrecovery.ca for more.

Key Facts

  • Current signatories of the letter include Clean Energy Canada, the Canadian Wind Energy Association, the Canadian Solar Industries Association, MaRS, Innergex Renewable Energy, Ballard, Canada Cleantech, Efficiency Canada, Advanced Biofuels Canada, Electric Mobility Canada, Waterpower Canada, Energy Storage Canada, the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, the Vancouver Economic Commission, ChargePoint, Corvus Energy, Lion Electric, Carbon Engineering, Stantec, Enercon, ecobee and many more. To see the full list of signatories, go to www.resilientrecovery.ca.
  • The clean energy sector employs 298,000 Canadians in a wide range of jobs: insulating homes, developing clean technologies, manufacturing electric vehicles and deploying charging infrastructure, building and maintaining wind, solar and hydro projects, producing renewable fuels and more.
  • Climate action also supports competitiveness and new opportunities in other sectors of the economy. These include jobs in low-carbon concrete, steel and aluminum, the auto sector, sustainably produced mass timber, agriculture, and mining the metals and minerals used in many clean technologies.
  • recent study from U.S. and U.K. economists found that clean stimulus would “create more jobs, deliver higher short-term returns per dollar spend and lead to increased long-term cost savings, by comparison with traditional fiscal stimulus.”
  • After the 2008 financial crisis, President Obama’s recovery spending in clean energy supported 900,000 job-years between 2009 and 2015.

Quotes

“A number of countries around the world, the EU, the International Energy Agency, the International Monetary Fund: what do they all have in common? Each is calling for clean stimulus, for a recovery that supports—not hinders—our crucial climate efforts. The idea of a resilient recovery is now mainstream, it’s good business, and it’s how Canada stays competitive.”

—Merran Smith, Executive Director, Clean Energy Canada

“There are an estimated 1,300 pure play clean technology companies across Canada, most of them small- and medium-sized businesses with massive potential for global growth. Throughout the stimulus and recovery process, Canada has a chance to support these Canadian innovators, create thousands of new, highly skilled jobs, and showcase home-grown technologies that can be exported around the world, all while helping meet our own climate targets. Let’s not let the opportunity slip through the cracks.”

—Jon Dogterom, Senior Vice-President, Venture Services, MaRS

“Canada is home to innovative, renewable energy companies like Innergex, whose mission is to build a better world with renewable energy. As we come through the COVID-19 crisis, Canada has the opportunity to rebuild the country to ensure we are positioned to address the climate crisis. At Innergex, we are ready to collaborate with governments and communities across the country to build economy-stimulating projects and provide family-supporting jobs through reliable and affordable renewable energy and infrastructure solutions for a resilient economic recovery.”

—Michel Letellier, President and CEO, Innergex Renewable Energy

“Supporting clean energy companies will not only create jobs in the short term but it will also help Canada to meet its emission reduction targets. We need to accelerate investments in the development, production and deployment of technology for zero-emission vehicles in order to be carbon neutral by 2050.”

—Randy MacEwen, President and CEO, Ballard Power Systems

– 30 – 

A resilient recovery: an open letter from Canada’s clean energy sector

April 8, 2020

OTTAWA — As the conversation in Canada shifts from immediate relief to economic recovery, new questions will arise: what does recovery look like, and how do we design stimulus that delivers secure jobs in a cleaner, innovative and diverse economy?

Done right, the federal government’s stimulus and recovery efforts can create jobs, spur cleantech innovation, encourage economic diversification, cut both carbon pollution and illness-causing air pollution, and ultimately make Canada a more resilient country.

On Friday, April 3, industry and non-profit leaders representing Canada’s clean energy sector—including renewable power, energy efficiency, cleantech, advanced biofuels and electric transportation—submitted an open letter to Prime Minister Trudeau on the need for clean-energy-focused stimulus in order to build a better, more resilient economy.

You can read the letter here. It emphasizes three overarching recommendations:

  1. To signal climate policy continuity and enhancement.
  2. To invest in sufficient, sustained and sustainable stimulus.
  3. And to move quickly to support clean energy solutions, Canadian cleantech innovation and businesses by expanding existing initiatives and programs.

In particular, the letter says, “investment in economic diversification must place special attention on the regions that need it most and that have seen record layoffs.”

The clean energy sector employs 298,000 Canadians in a wide range of jobs: insulating homes, developing clean technologies, manufacturing electric vehicles, building and maintaining wind, solar and hydro projects, producing renewable fuels—these are just a few examples. Independent modelling has found that, by 2030, Canada’s clean energy sector will employ 559,400 Canadians, thanks in part to climate policies and programs spurring a clean energy growth rate four times the Canadian average.

The energy transition is also enhancing competitiveness and creating new opportunities in other sectors of the economy. These include jobs in low-carbon concrete, steel and aluminum, sustainably produced mass timber, and mining the metals and minerals used in many clean technologies.

In short, a clean recovery creates winners across the country and across the economy. Organizations that support the letter are listed below. Read the letter here.

See contact information below for media interview requests.

Signatories

Merran Smith, Executive Director, Clean Energy Canada, Simon Fraser University

Anne-Raphaëlle Audouin, President & CEO, WaterPower Canada

Robert Hornung, President, Canadian Wind Energy Association

Wesley Johnston, President and CEO, Canadian Solar Industries Association

Daniel Breton, President and CEO, Electric Mobility Canada

Corey Diamond, Executive Director, Efficiency Canada

Ian Thomson, President, Advanced Biofuels Canada

Julia Langer, CEO, The Atmospheric Fund

Jacob Malthouse, Canada Cleantech Alliance

Jeanette Jackson, CEO, Foresight Cleantech Accelerator

Denis Leclerc, President and CEO, Écotech Québec

Maike Althaus, Executive Director, Ontario Clean Technology Industry Association

-30-

Hybrid projects have huge potential: A conversation with Tom Levy

March 24, 2020

In the global transition to affordable, reliable, flexible and sustainable energy systems, Canada is playing an important role — and stakeholders across the country are embracing the change.

A recent report from the Generation Energy Council — a national group of experts, industry professionals and government leaders — articulates a vision that includes more investment in clean electricity, slashing energy waste and using more renewable fuels.

To learn more about how Canada is leading the charge, we caught up with Tom Levy, a senior wind engineer and head of wind energy research and development for Natural Resources Canada at the CanmetENERGY lab in Ottawa.

Electricity Transformation Canada: What are your thoughts about the progress we’ve made in transforming Canada’s electricity system? Are you encouraged?

Tom Levy: In the early days, we were trying to understand the tools that we would need at the system level to get to five or 10 per cent penetration [of renewable energy] within the energy mix. Now we’re talking about, “What does 100 per cent look like?” Now that systems have proven reliable at five and 10 per cent penetration, we can think bigger. The tools that were identified to support system reliability at these low levels are in use, and generally speaking, they work – this is now allowing us to think big – and 100 per cent is thinking big.

Canada has made progress. System operators and the industry have collectively advanced our understanding of how to operate power systems with reasonably high levels of renewables.

And there are a few examples in Canada that we can point to that have been able to successfully do so.

The question we are asking at CanmetENERGY-Ottawa is what’s next? How do we develop the tools that are needed to move us to 100 per cent? How do the grid codes need to evolve? How can we more effectively utilize inverter-based resources to support system reliability? What new tools will be needed?

ETC: What are your thoughts about the viability of hybrid projects that leverage wind, solar and energy storage?

TL: Based on our research, it is our understanding that multi-technology solutions will be necessary. It is unlikely that any single technology will achieve our carbon reduction goals.

So certainly, the interplay between wind, solar, storage and hydro — and interconnection and flexible and aggregated demand — are all expected to be part of that picture of what the future power system looks like.

Read full interview on ETC’s official website: https://electricitytransformation.ca/blog/hybrid-projects-have-huge-potential-a-conversation-with-tom-levy/