Hornung named head of Canadian Renewable Energy Association

May 21, 2020

The Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) and the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) that, effective July 1, 2020, the members of CanSIA and CanWEA will unite within the Canadian Renewable Energy Association under the trusted leadership of Robert Hornung, the long-standing president of CanWEA.

“The launch of the Canadian Renewable Energy Association is a major step forward toward the realization of more comprehensive energy solutions encompassing wind, solar and energy storage in Canada,” said Michelle Chislett, interim board chair of the Canadian Renewable Energy Association. “It needs a leader with a clear vision of the modern energy system we’re building in Canada, and an understanding of our membership’s unique role in that effort. Robert Hornung brings that to the table, and we look forward to his leadership as our industries join forces in this very exciting new endeavour.”

Read more: https://www.renewcanada.net/hornung-named-head-of-canadian-renewable-energy-association/

ReNew Canada

Robert Hornung to Lead the Canadian Renewable Energy Association

May 20, 2020

The Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) and the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) announced a leader for a new multi-technology association that will provide a unified voice for solar energy, wind energy and energy storage in Canada. Effective July 1, 2020, the members of CanSIA and CanWEA will unite within the Canadian Renewable Energy Association under the leadership of Robert Hornung, the long-standing president of CanWEA.

Read more: https://environmentjournal.ca/robert-hornung-to-lead-the-canadian-renewable-energy-association/

Environment Journal

CanWEA, CanSIA Form the Canadian Renewable Energy Association

May 20, 2020

The Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) and the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) have partnered to form the Canadian Renewable Energy Association and have named Robert Hornung president and CEO.

As the founding president and CEO of the Canadian Renewable Energy Association, Hornung will lead the member-based association in stakeholder advocacy and public engagement focused on ensuring that renewable energy and energy storage play a central role in transforming Canada’s energy mix during this period of global transformation.

Read more: https://nawindpower.com/canwea-cansia-form-the-canadian-renewable-energy-association

North American Windpower

Hornung to lead “new national voice” for wind, solar and energy storage industries

May 19, 2020

May 19, 2020 – Back in February, we reported that renewables groups CanWEA and CanSIA would be amalgamating into a new, as-yet unnamed association. Today, the Canadian Wind Energy Association and the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) made the big reveal.

Effective July 1, 2020, the members of CanSIA and CanWEA will unite as the Canadian Renewable Energy Association—a “multi-technology association that will provide a unified voice for solar energy, wind energy, and energy storage in Canada”.

Read more: https://www.ebmag.com/hornung-to-lead-new-national-voice-for-wind-solar-and-energy-storage-industries/

Electrical Business

Robert Hornung to Lead the Canadian Renewable Energy Association

May 19, 2020

Today the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) and the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) are pleased to announce the name and leader of the new multi-technology association that will provide a unified voice for solar energy, wind energy, and energy storage in Canada. Effective July 1, 2020, the members of CanSIA and CanWEA will unite within the Canadian Renewable Energy Association under the trusted leadership of Robert Hornung, the long-standing president of CanWEA.

Read more: https://electricalline.com/robert-hornung-lead-canadian-renewable-energy-association

Electrical Line Magazine

Canadian Clean Energy Sector Seeks Stimulus Funding

March 25, 2020

Canada should speed up funding for wind energy, hydro power, and electric vehicles to stimulate the economy during the coronavirus pandemic as it bails out the oil and gas sector, green industry groups said.

Federal green energy procurement programs, funding for charging stations, and electrical grid expansion policies should be accelerated or expanded to ensure Canada meets its global climate change obligations, the industry representatives said.

Stimulus spending could both help companies hurt by the effects of the new coronavirus, and provide a way for Canada to keep its economy afloat, the groups said.

Read more: https://news.bloombergenvironment.com/environment-and-energy/green-energy-seeks-funding-ahead-of-canadas-oil-and-gas-bailout

Bloomberg Environment

Hybrid projects have huge potential: A conversation with Tom Levy

March 24, 2020

In the global transition to affordable, reliable, flexible and sustainable energy systems, Canada is playing an important role — and stakeholders across the country are embracing the change.

A recent report from the Generation Energy Council — a national group of experts, industry professionals and government leaders — articulates a vision that includes more investment in clean electricity, slashing energy waste and using more renewable fuels.

To learn more about how Canada is leading the charge, we caught up with Tom Levy, a senior wind engineer and head of wind energy research and development for Natural Resources Canada at the CanmetENERGY lab in Ottawa.

Electricity Transformation Canada: What are your thoughts about the progress we’ve made in transforming Canada’s electricity system? Are you encouraged?

Tom Levy: In the early days, we were trying to understand the tools that we would need at the system level to get to five or 10 per cent penetration [of renewable energy] within the energy mix. Now we’re talking about, “What does 100 per cent look like?” Now that systems have proven reliable at five and 10 per cent penetration, we can think bigger. The tools that were identified to support system reliability at these low levels are in use, and generally speaking, they work – this is now allowing us to think big – and 100 per cent is thinking big.

Canada has made progress. System operators and the industry have collectively advanced our understanding of how to operate power systems with reasonably high levels of renewables.

And there are a few examples in Canada that we can point to that have been able to successfully do so.

The question we are asking at CanmetENERGY-Ottawa is what’s next? How do we develop the tools that are needed to move us to 100 per cent? How do the grid codes need to evolve? How can we more effectively utilize inverter-based resources to support system reliability? What new tools will be needed?

ETC: What are your thoughts about the viability of hybrid projects that leverage wind, solar and energy storage?

TL: Based on our research, it is our understanding that multi-technology solutions will be necessary. It is unlikely that any single technology will achieve our carbon reduction goals.

So certainly, the interplay between wind, solar, storage and hydro — and interconnection and flexible and aggregated demand — are all expected to be part of that picture of what the future power system looks like.

Read full interview on ETC’s official website: https://electricitytransformation.ca/blog/hybrid-projects-have-huge-potential-a-conversation-with-tom-levy/

Renewable energy should be the cornerstone of Canada’s net zero strategy

February 14, 2020

Anne-Raphaëlle Audouin, Robert Hornung, Wesley Johnston and Elisa Obermann are the leaders of the Canadian Council on Renewable Electricity (“CanCORE”), a collaborative initiative of Canada’s four national trade associations for the water, wind, solar and marine energy sectors. These sectors produce 68 per cent of Canada’s total annual electricity.

The government of Canada has embraced a goal of achieving “net-zero” greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions economy wide by 2050, a target that has also been adopted by partners in the European Union, United Kingdom and some key U.S. states.

To get there, Canada will have to finish the job of moving off fossil fuels in the electricity sector, and then switch to clean power to fuel much of our transportation, buildings and industry.

Achieving that 2050 target will require a herculean effort, but we start with a competitive advantage.

Some 68 per cent of our electricity already comes from renewable water, wind, solar and marine energy resources. That’s three-and-half times the amount of electricity currently produced from fossil fuels – mainly coal and natural gas – in Canada.

With its vast and untapped renewable energy potential, Canada’s electricity sector is well positioned to play a major role in our future “net-zero” energy mix and we have the ability to move to a virtually 100-per-cent non-GHG-emitting electricity grid over the next 30 years. The flexible and dependable foundation provided by Canada’s existing waterpower infrastructure, coupled with the rapidly plunging costs of our wind and solar resources, makes renewable energy the least costly option for new clean and reliable power.

Read more: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/commentary/article-renewable-energy-should-be-the-cornerstone-of-canadas-net-zero/

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