Wind Energy, Solar Energy and Energy Storage Companies Unite in Canada

New Canadian Renewable Energy Association positioned to provide solutions for Canada’s energy transition

Ottawa, Ontario, July 6, 2020 – Effective July 1, 2020, the Canadian Renewable Energy Association is the new multi-technology industry association that provides a unified voice for solar energy, wind energy, and energy storage in Canada. It has been created by uniting the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) and the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) into a new, expanded association that also includes energy storage. 

The new association is being launched against the backdrop of a global pandemic, which has fueled a debate about Canada’s energy future and the acceleration of the ongoing transition to a cleaner, low-carbon economy.

“The Canadian Renewable Energy Association will be advocating for investment in wind energy, solar energy and energy storage projects that can deliver both jobs and economic benefits today, as well as the infrastructure that will provide a foundation for significantly more investment in the jobs, economic activity and energy solutions of tomorrow,” said Robert Hornung, the founding President and CEO of the Canadian Renewable Energy Association. “While this has been a time of tremendous challenge for our country, the pandemic also presents Canada with an opportunity to invest in sustainable pathways for addressing economic and environmental challenges.” 

If Canada is to meet its target of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, a significantly expanded non-emitting electricity grid will be needed to support increased use of electricity in transportation, buildings and industry. Success will require wind energy, solar energy and energy storage technologies to play a critical role in this effort.

In Canada and around the world, electricity systems are rapidly innovating and modernizing to leverage new technologies and wind energy, solar energy and energy storage are rapidly becoming the low-cost solution for Canada’s future electricity needs. The rapid growth of wind energy, solar energy and energy storage solutions around the world is also enhancing the reliability, flexibility and scalability of energy production and use. 

The solutions provided by our technologies present exciting new opportunities for investment. Bloomberg projects US $9.5 trillion in global investment in wind and solar energy between 2018 and 2050 and almost US $1 trillion more in batteries for energy storage. These figures represent 77 per cent of the total projected global investment in power generation over that period. 

The scalability of wind energy, solar energy and energy storage means these technologies can transform Canada’s energy system by providing solutions at both micro and macro scales. At the micro level, distributed energy resources can be deployed to convert remote communities from diesel generators to sustainable micro-grids using solar panels and industrial-sized batteries. They can promote increased energy self-sufficiency through deployment of rooftop solar panels in neighbourhoods across the country or on big-city office buildings or university campuses. On a larger, utility scale, these technologies can be deployed in complementary ways to supply and support the broader electricity grid, or they can be used in hybrid applications where facilities use wind energy, solar energy and energy storage to provide utility-scale power. 

“The 300+ members of our new Association will advocate for policies – federally and provincially – that facilitate and enable delivery of the low-cost, non-emitting solutions increasingly sought by Canadian electricity consumers,” said Michelle Chislett, Interim Board Chair of the Canadian Renewable Energy Association, and Managing Director for Canada & U.S. Development at Northland Power. “Our members are ready and willing to help Canada capture the synergies that connect wind energy, solar energy and energy storage technologies.” 

“The transition to clean and renewable sources of energy will have significant positive impacts for consumers, the economy and the environment,” says Jason Chee-Aloy, Interim Board Vice Chair of the Canadian Renewable Energy Association and Managing Director at Power Advisory LLC. “The solar energy, wind energy and energy storage industries will help Canada reduce its emissions while also providing economic opportunities in urban centres, rural areas and in Indigenous communities across the country.”

Background 

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About the Canadian Renewable Energy Association (CanREA)

The Canadian Renewable Energy Association is the voice for wind energy, solar energy and energy storage solutions that will power Canada’s energy future. Our association works to create the conditions for a modern energy system through stakeholder advocacy and public engagement. Our diverse members are uniquely positioned to deliver clean, low-cost, reliable, flexible and scalable solutions for Canada’s energy needs. Our vision is to ensure wind energy, solar energy and energy storage play a central role in transforming Canada’s energy mix.

Follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. Subscribe to our newsletter. Become a member. Learn more at renewablesassociation.ca

For more information or for interview opportunities, please contact:

Bridget Wayland, Director of Communications

Canadian Renewable Energy Association

613-227-5378

bwayland@renewablesassociation.ca

Capital Power to increase Whitla Wind facility to 353 MW, largest in Alberta

June 26, 2020

Houston — Capital Power Corp. is moving into phase three of its Whitla Wind facility, which will increase the project to 353 MW once complete at the end of 2021, making it the largest wind facility in Alberta.

Phase three will expand the facility, located in the County of Forty Mile in southeastern Alberta, by constructing the 54-MW Whitla Wind 3, according to a company statement.

“As a company focused on delivering responsible energy for tomorrow, we work to build and grow our renewable asset portfolio alongside our natural gas baseload generation assets,” Capital Power Spokeswoman Katherine Perron said June 26. “Currently, we own 10 wind facilities in Canada and the US, representing 1,217 MW of our generation portfolio.”

Read more: https://www.spglobal.com/platts/en/market-insights/latest-news/electric-power/062620-capital-power-to-increase-whitla-wind-facility-to-353-mw-largest-in-alberta

Canadian wind and solar associations join forces

May 26, 2020

The Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) and the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) have announced the name and leader of the new multi-technology association that will provide a unified voice for solar energy, wind energy, and energy storage in Canada. Effective July 1, 2020, the members of CanSIA and CanWEA will unite within the Canadian Renewable Energy Association under the leadership of Robert Hornung, the long-standing president of CanWEA.

Read more: https://www.windtech-international.com/industry-news/canadian-wind-and-solar-associations-join-forces

The interview: Canada can create jobs, set a ‘signpost’ for the world in shift to 100% renewable electricity, Hornung says

May 24, 2020

Robert Hornung has been president of the Canadian Wind Energy Association since 2003. Last week, CanWEA and the Canadian Solar Industries Association announced they are merging to form the Canadian Renewable Energy Association, with Hornung at the helm. He talked to The Energy Mix about a massive moment of opportunity for solar, wind, and storage, and the importance of speaking with a common voice.

The Energy Mix: Are you calling this a merger, and what do you see as the advantages?

Hornung: I wish we could say we were the first. In Australia, the associations came together several years ago now in the Clean Energy Council, which has demonstrated that the technologies have a lot of common interests and can cooperate and work together.
So yes, this is a merger that recognizes the natural synergies between the technologies to give ourselves a more powerful voice in advocacy and communications—and frankly, to present a more comprehensive solution and product that addresses the concerns we’re increasingly hearing around reliability. The new association is not focused just on wind and solar energy, but also on energy storage. So we can talk about offering solutions all the way from the residential homeowner, in terms of solar PV and batteries, to large, utility-scale projects. It captures the full potential of the technologies.

Read full interview here: https://theenergymix.com/2020/05/24/the-interview-canada-can-create-jobs-set-a-signpost-for-the-world-in-shift-to-100-renewable-electricity-hornung-says/

The Energy Mix

Robert Hornung to lead the Canadian Renewable Energy Association

May 19, 2020

A new national voice for the wind, solar and energy storage industries  

OTTAWA, May 19, 2020 /CNW/ – Today the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) and the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) are pleased to announce the name and leader of the new multi-technology association that will provide a unified voice for solar energy, wind energy, and energy storage in Canada. Effective July 1, 2020, the members of CanSIA and CanWEA will unite within the Canadian Renewable Energy Association under the trusted leadership of Robert Hornung, the long-standing president of CanWEA.

Read more: https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/robert-hornung-to-lead-the-canadian-renewable-energy-association-830717631.html

Cision

Companies across Canada united on vision for a resilient recovery

May 13, 2020

CANADA – COVID-19 has disrupted our way of life, and immediate relief has been the priority of governments. But what will recovery look like? And how do we ensure recovery measures aren’t just shovel-ready but shovel-worthy?

A new public letter asking Canadian governments to pursue a “resilient recovery” has attracted the signatures of companies and industry associations across Canada. As of Tuesday, over 200 signatories representing over 2,000 Canadian companies had joined the campaign asking federal and provincial governments to commit to a three-part recovery and resilience plan that would:

  • invest stimulus into Canada’s fast-growing clean energy and cleantech sectors and the local production and export of world-leading low- and zero-carbon commodities;
  • act quickly to support clean energy and cleantech solutions and businesses by expanding existing initiatives and programs; and
  • signal clearly that Canada will continue and expand on its climate and environmental policies.

The letter also emphasizes regional equity and “training and retraining for Canadians whose past jobs may not return, in programs that can and should start now while unemployed workers are sitting at home.”

Ultimately, the signatories say, government stimulus and recovery efforts can do more than just create jobs: they’re an opportunity to encourage economic diversification and innovation, cut both carbon pollution and illness-causing air pollution, and make Canada a more resilient country.

Visit resilientrecovery.ca for more.

Key Facts

  • Current signatories of the letter include Clean Energy Canada, the Canadian Wind Energy Association, the Canadian Solar Industries Association, MaRS, Innergex Renewable Energy, Ballard, Canada Cleantech, Efficiency Canada, Advanced Biofuels Canada, Electric Mobility Canada, Waterpower Canada, Energy Storage Canada, the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, the Vancouver Economic Commission, ChargePoint, Corvus Energy, Lion Electric, Carbon Engineering, Stantec, Enercon, ecobee and many more. To see the full list of signatories, go to www.resilientrecovery.ca.
  • The clean energy sector employs 298,000 Canadians in a wide range of jobs: insulating homes, developing clean technologies, manufacturing electric vehicles and deploying charging infrastructure, building and maintaining wind, solar and hydro projects, producing renewable fuels and more.
  • Climate action also supports competitiveness and new opportunities in other sectors of the economy. These include jobs in low-carbon concrete, steel and aluminum, the auto sector, sustainably produced mass timber, agriculture, and mining the metals and minerals used in many clean technologies.
  • recent study from U.S. and U.K. economists found that clean stimulus would “create more jobs, deliver higher short-term returns per dollar spend and lead to increased long-term cost savings, by comparison with traditional fiscal stimulus.”
  • After the 2008 financial crisis, President Obama’s recovery spending in clean energy supported 900,000 job-years between 2009 and 2015.

Quotes

“A number of countries around the world, the EU, the International Energy Agency, the International Monetary Fund: what do they all have in common? Each is calling for clean stimulus, for a recovery that supports—not hinders—our crucial climate efforts. The idea of a resilient recovery is now mainstream, it’s good business, and it’s how Canada stays competitive.”

—Merran Smith, Executive Director, Clean Energy Canada

“There are an estimated 1,300 pure play clean technology companies across Canada, most of them small- and medium-sized businesses with massive potential for global growth. Throughout the stimulus and recovery process, Canada has a chance to support these Canadian innovators, create thousands of new, highly skilled jobs, and showcase home-grown technologies that can be exported around the world, all while helping meet our own climate targets. Let’s not let the opportunity slip through the cracks.”

—Jon Dogterom, Senior Vice-President, Venture Services, MaRS

“Canada is home to innovative, renewable energy companies like Innergex, whose mission is to build a better world with renewable energy. As we come through the COVID-19 crisis, Canada has the opportunity to rebuild the country to ensure we are positioned to address the climate crisis. At Innergex, we are ready to collaborate with governments and communities across the country to build economy-stimulating projects and provide family-supporting jobs through reliable and affordable renewable energy and infrastructure solutions for a resilient economic recovery.”

—Michel Letellier, President and CEO, Innergex Renewable Energy

“Supporting clean energy companies will not only create jobs in the short term but it will also help Canada to meet its emission reduction targets. We need to accelerate investments in the development, production and deployment of technology for zero-emission vehicles in order to be carbon neutral by 2050.”

—Randy MacEwen, President and CEO, Ballard Power Systems

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A resilient recovery: an open letter from Canada’s clean energy sector

April 8, 2020

OTTAWA — As the conversation in Canada shifts from immediate relief to economic recovery, new questions will arise: what does recovery look like, and how do we design stimulus that delivers secure jobs in a cleaner, innovative and diverse economy?

Done right, the federal government’s stimulus and recovery efforts can create jobs, spur cleantech innovation, encourage economic diversification, cut both carbon pollution and illness-causing air pollution, and ultimately make Canada a more resilient country.

On Friday, April 3, industry and non-profit leaders representing Canada’s clean energy sector—including renewable power, energy efficiency, cleantech, advanced biofuels and electric transportation—submitted an open letter to Prime Minister Trudeau on the need for clean-energy-focused stimulus in order to build a better, more resilient economy.

You can read the letter here. It emphasizes three overarching recommendations:

  1. To signal climate policy continuity and enhancement.
  2. To invest in sufficient, sustained and sustainable stimulus.
  3. And to move quickly to support clean energy solutions, Canadian cleantech innovation and businesses by expanding existing initiatives and programs.

In particular, the letter says, “investment in economic diversification must place special attention on the regions that need it most and that have seen record layoffs.”

The clean energy sector employs 298,000 Canadians in a wide range of jobs: insulating homes, developing clean technologies, manufacturing electric vehicles, building and maintaining wind, solar and hydro projects, producing renewable fuels—these are just a few examples. Independent modelling has found that, by 2030, Canada’s clean energy sector will employ 559,400 Canadians, thanks in part to climate policies and programs spurring a clean energy growth rate four times the Canadian average.

The energy transition is also enhancing competitiveness and creating new opportunities in other sectors of the economy. These include jobs in low-carbon concrete, steel and aluminum, sustainably produced mass timber, and mining the metals and minerals used in many clean technologies.

In short, a clean recovery creates winners across the country and across the economy. Organizations that support the letter are listed below. Read the letter here.

See contact information below for media interview requests.

Signatories

Merran Smith, Executive Director, Clean Energy Canada, Simon Fraser University

Anne-Raphaëlle Audouin, President & CEO, WaterPower Canada

Robert Hornung, President, Canadian Wind Energy Association

Wesley Johnston, President and CEO, Canadian Solar Industries Association

Daniel Breton, President and CEO, Electric Mobility Canada

Corey Diamond, Executive Director, Efficiency Canada

Ian Thomson, President, Advanced Biofuels Canada

Julia Langer, CEO, The Atmospheric Fund

Jacob Malthouse, Canada Cleantech Alliance

Jeanette Jackson, CEO, Foresight Cleantech Accelerator

Denis Leclerc, President and CEO, Écotech Québec

Maike Althaus, Executive Director, Ontario Clean Technology Industry Association

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CanWEA Hosts O&M Summit in GTA

February 26, 2020

Over 300 industry professionals took part in the CanWEA Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Summit in Mississauga recently. Attendees listened to over 40 speakers, who discussed a variety of topics, which focused on advancements in the wind energy space.

“There are tremendous opportunities for future wind energy development and operation that will depend on sustained efforts and new strategies. These efforts will be crucial to our industry’s ongoing competitiveness, coupled with continued high safety and environmental standards,” said Robert Hornung, President, Canadian Wind Energy Association. “And as an industry, we also need to become even more focused on our customers – utilities, system operators and others – and on the products and solutions they need. Increasingly, those solutions will extend beyond energy alone, and encompass a range of ancillary services that wind energy is in fact very well-positioned to provide. Customer-focused solutions will also increasingly encompass not just wind energy alone, but other forms of renewable generation, plus energy storage. Wind developers and operators will remain key players in that future.”

Read more: https://www.mromagazine.com/2020/02/26/canwea-hosts-om-summit-in-gta/

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